The path of non-violence

We are surrounded by violence today, and the media too is eager to bring it to us.  Our body, mind and soul are being filled with violence. So much so that, for the common man today, violence has become the first and surest means to resolve problems. Little do we realise the immense power of non-violence. That it alone can make us live a real and fulfilling life. That non-violence is also the road to self-discovery. There is an instinct of aggression in all of us — for self preservation.  Children show an affinity for violence early on.  But the real man, a true man, is a product of non-violence. We hurt others, and in doing so, ourselves in many ways through violence – in thought, speech and action. It is no exaggeration but an evident fact that the world today is burning with violence. Whether it is at home, the neighbourhood, or the world affairs at large. We are injuring others...
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Can Gandhi still save us?

Gandhi and Nehru (Photo credit: taruntej) No Indian name in the world today is more familiar than that of Gandhi, besides that of Mother Theresa (who probably owes her popularity to the beauty pageants.) Non-violence and peace are not new concepts in the Indian tradition. Entire creeds are built around these. Making them into the central axis of a political movement was a new phenomenon. There are still undercurrents of dislike for the great man. And everyone has something or the other to testify against his goodness. Some common topics include his sleeping with naked girl attendents, his role in the partition, the Bhagat Singh affair, his kind gestures towards Pakistan at the time of partition, his drinking of fruit juice to break his fast during the partition violence, etc. This last one generated a lot of emotions in the play based on his assassin. Is the dislike due to his ascetic and other-worldly personal ethic? Do we accuse him of hypocrisy? Or are...
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What India owes to England

It would be unfair and unjust if India does not acknowledge the contribution Britain, and the West in general, made to its well being and prosperity. Whatever India is today, most of its social, political, economic institutions, is because of the English rule from the 19th to the middle of 20th century. Written from the writer’s personal understanding, the following is a case for acknowledging this huge debt. Whether it is India’s democracy and parliament, laws and courts, science and technology, education, market economy, press and media, or cultural aspects of life — how Indians dress, eat, socialise, and entertain, it is today what it is in large part due to the West. More so today than just a decade ago, with a large portion of our very jobs, related to outsourcing, are due to the West which now reaps the rewards of sowing the seeds of English education on India’s fertile soil. (It was, of course, India’s Tata group, led...
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