11 Things You Should Never Do on Facebook if You’re in a Relationship

http://www.ivillage.com/10-things-never-do-facebook-if-you-are-relationship/6-a-523101 11. And don’t make it public before it is confirmed. :/) Don’t know why I am blogging this! When internet arose, spending too much time online was said to be unsocial. Social networks seem to be a nerd’s all too successful revenge on this theory. ...
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The urban Indian behaviour in a nutshell

Insightful article on what it means to be an Indian by an Indian newspaper editor from Mumbai. Re-blogged from: Observations about the urban Indian by Aakar Patel www.paklinks.com/gs/culture-literature-and-linguistics/300216-urban-indian-behaviour-unfolded.html Much of the writer’s observations hold true on the ground, though I doubt if some of these values are not present in other cultures too, and whether these are mere ground realities or a defining framework. Most of us behave as if we have been let loose into the outside world from an internal madhouse. The internal and the external – these, I guess, are the two worlds that mankind is fated to live in, as a famous economist wrote....
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Highway – movie review

Sometimes a scream is better than a thesis. – Emerson I was going to write a negative review, but then even falsities leave a tincture of truth behind. Negative things like – does the movie tacitly endorse or promote trafficking of girls? That’s a harsh reality in this part of the world. But the story turns itself round, like a projectile hurled towards us, and stuns the audience. And we leave perplexed, depressed, and tired of a long, rambling journey. A young teenager about to be married is kidnapped, begins to enjoy the journey, and gets attracted to the captor (a calming, safe and reassuring presence of a free man?). He doesn’t lust for her, but has other sinister designs. The journey takes us to the snow laden peaks of the Himalayas, where the girl finally finds her dream home and life – to cook and clean, use kajal, and make her own little world among the tribal sheep herders of Himalayas....
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Heartless

I left Heartless after the first half, and came to know that the real action and thrill really begins in the second! The almost empty theatre was probably graced by the screenplay writer herself, as when her name showed up on screen, there was some loud cheer and a guy next to her stood up and clapped. This story is about the mother-son duo, and a remake of ‘Awake’. I get to know that the mother finally saves the son. When Indian films do a remake of a Hollywood movie, the first to undergo ‘adaptation’ are the characters, who get moulded in the stereotypes and roles that are now all too well known. Other things that change are identities of the conflicting elements, locations, humour, dialogues, the usual songs and dances, and religion. Which raises a kuestion: why are we constrained by such typified, typecast roles and stereotypes, and tend to classify people first, rather than see them in totality? It has spoiled Indian movies...
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Hansi toh phasi – movie review

When science meets sanskar… so it was described in a review. Not a rom-com, it turns out more like a tragi-comedy. The leading character here is a rebellious girl, who abandons or is forced to leave home, and goes to no less a place than China to pursue her research. The result is a super-density ball that can bounce non-stop, apparently forever, and thus a potential solver of all power shortage issues. Abandoned and hated by her family, the prototype science nerd displays unstable behaviour, is a family thief, in depression, a former drug user, probably a lesbo, and now addicted to pills, sugar and toothpaste. She finally returns, because she wants to see her father, and apologise for her behaviour. The story here, like in many Indian films, matters, and matters not. A movie sells many things – its performers, music, location, dialogues, humour, and Indian culture. That’s what we buy. This movie has only antics to sell, and a badly judgmental characterisation....
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The good, the young and the middle class

Copyright: baloocartoons.com “Those guys there, they are not good,” the respectable gentleman in a somewhat tipsy mood, pointed and spilled his heart out. He went on to gesture at another set of boys in T-shirts and jeans, and gave them a clean chit. The objects of his instant derision were a group of street boys, dressed in street-seller garbs, who stood in a throng of nearly a thousand. The event was an open air music show at Kala Ghoda, probably around 2001/2. I listened in silence, because words sank in my chest. Nothing in my past experience had given me this remarkable insight, nor could I ever judge unknown people at mere sight. In spite of instances to support this thought, I still can’t concur with it. What made them out as the ‘bad’ ones? Their drab clothes? Their lower class,  education, and poverty? And the ones who wore clean, fashionable clothes, and spoke English, were good. So, are the middle-class people good?! The respectable...
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The traveler’s tailspin

Those who have travelled for the sake of travelling would relate to this well. Our biggest motivation to give up the routine and take to the wheels is to pull out of the player’s role, and become an outside observer. And travelling affords this keyhole view of life perfectly well. Reading, watching movies, attending a sport arena are some others. Yet travelling is superior, because it puts your very soul into motion. And not just for a few hours, but days on end. Your world goes topsy turvy. Everything, just changes! When I was young, I loved train travel. The sight of green trees and wild bushes, and the ever changing landscape that blazed past me would dull my senses and fill up imagination. So the traveller, no longer a part of the game, in a new land and among unknown people, now observes life go past him, people going about their business, yet not touching him the way they could do earlier. If he...
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The social matrix

We may have built a society unknowingly, but man is still a handiwork of nature. So there are things that will always sprout from their origins, and wrap around us like a web or a matrix. Many years ago, as I was returning from work on a winter night, I overheard a girl talk on her cellphone. “It’s always the son that a mother likes more,” she exclaimed, stressing out the relevant words. We see it played out in Hindi movies all too often, in scenes that we make fun of for their over-sentimentality. The play ‘Bollywood ka Salaam, 1960s Ke Naam’ did that remarkably well, in a scene when the son returns home from abroad, and the mother awaits him with a bowl of kheer in  her hands. And in ‘Qurbani’ we see the father-daughter pair. Let me try and create a little controversy. Does the preference for sons arise from here, or is it the other way round? The sciences may have many theories...
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Is happiness the only thing in life?

“Whatever we do is for our happiness,” my cousin sister put it across me, quickening her pace as she joined me on the night stroll. The conversation happened nearly two decades ago in a city adjoining Delhi. Years later, I sometimes reflected back at that small talk, wondering at the motivations, the tussles and tribulations of the young minds, that lay underneath. Those were the 1990s, when youthful aspirations were again in conflict with the preceding generations. My own state of mind in those days was one of inner absorption, undisturbed by the harsh grind of reality around. I was rather indifferent to the pulls and attractions of the world. Happiness is what everyone wants to reduce all of our actions and behaviour to. Maybe it is the case. But I always thought there were other matters that did not involve  pleasure. It couldn’t be just for my own happiness that I did everything I did. Everyone in the world today wants to be...
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