Movie review – Haathi Mere Saathi

Before the cult of violence took over Bollywood, they made films like Haathi Mere Saathi (Elephant, my friend). Rajesh Khanna, who died recently, had that friendly, disarming style of speaking and acting which may not be seen again. The movie, made in the typical over-the-reality dramatic Indian style, doesn’t fail to entertain, adults and kids alike. A group of four small elephants save the life of Raju, who is lost in a jungle after a car accident. He brings them home, and his father before dying instructs him to never let them go. Thus begins the tale of legal disputes, poverty, struggle for a life, and a love affair that ultimately yields fruit. The small city zoo run by Raju, pyaar ki duniya (a world of love)  must now face competition from his arch enemies, and torn between his love for the elephants and his family, Raju must find a way out. This was the movie that Rajesh Khanna is said to...
Read More

Go win da day

Govinda break dahi handi at Parel, Mumbai It seems to always rain during the August festivals, like Govinda (Janmashtmi) in Mumbai. They come loaded in trucks and vans, many on bikes, all soaked up in the Monsoon showers. There is less money involved now, it is said. So the falling heights of 7+ storey structures may not be seen. The smaller ones go bust by noon, and the challenging handis towering over the head are brought down by late evening. There are only a few traditional and Bollywood songs played everywhere, and these are about teasing village belles carrying water in their earthen pots, just like the child Krishna did. They sure don’t spare girls on this day, and so the kids staying in the upper floors were pretty thrilled as they spotted and threw water balloons at single girls passing underneath. Where or when else, apart from festivals, is Indian culture seen in its multi-hued splendour? Here is a small, incomplete list: –...
Read More

What ails the Indian culture today?

‘Naturalised’ citizens of National Park, Borivali Taking a stroll on the wooded path leading to the Kanheri Caves brings us in touch with our long lost cousins. The mother above showed great acumen in holding her baby tight, shielded from the jungle around, the baby sucking on her breast. An Indian family gleefully clicked their cameras, and the woman with them gave me a rather  ‘blushing’ look as she pointed out the mother-baby duo to the kids. Perhaps inspired, a few yards away, a group of foreigners, white men and women, enjoyed a ‘swing’ on the loose tree branches. And I wondered, in private, going by their fair skin, whether their asses were as pink as of their primitive cousins. 🙂 The topic of this post is, however, not a joke. Going out for a cigarette to gather my thoughts, and will continue with this rather monstrous subject. It’s related to the above pic, no kidding! There is no bare-ass truth to be told here....
Read More